Senior School Certificate Examination (XI-XII) Fine Arts 2018-19

CBSE Curriculum for Senior School Certificate Examination (XI-XII) Fine Arts 2018-19

30. FINE ARTS CBSE
A student may offer any one of the following courses:
(a)     Painting (Code No. 049)
OR
(b)     Graphics (Code No. 050)
OR
(c)     Sculpture (Code No. 051)
OR
(d)     Applied Art-Commerci al Art (Code No. 052)
The following art terminologies for all the four subjects are prescribed only for reference and general
enrichment.
1.   Elements of Composition
2.   Principles of Composition
3.   Drawing & Painting
Materials
4.   Media of Composition
5.   Sculpture
6.   Graphics
7.   Applied Art
8.   Portfolio Assessment Method :
Point, line, form, colour,tone, texture and space.
Unity, harmony, balance, rhythm, emphasis and proportion, abstraction and stylisation.
Foreshortening, perspective, eye- level,fixed point of view,vanishing point,ratio-proportion, sketching, drawing, light and shade, still-life,
land-scape,anatomy, vertical, horizontal,two and three dimensional, transparent and opaque.
Paper (Cartridge, Canvas and Hard-board Handmade, etc.), pencil, water,acrylic colours, tempera colours, poster colours, pastel colours, waterproof ink.
Collage, Mosaic, Painting, Mural, Fresco, Batik Tie and Dye.
Relief and round sculpture, modelling with clay, terra-cotta, carving in wood, stone, bronze casting, plaster of Paris and metal welding.
Linocut, relief printing, etching, Lithography, silk screen printing, letter press and offset printing.
Book cover design and illustration, cartoon,  poster, advertisements
for newspaper and magazine, animation and printing processes, photography, computer-graphic, hoarding and T.V .
Introduction : The Art Portfolio willconsist of a compilation of all art works, from sketch to finished product .
The submission would include both the original and improved versions of assigned tasks reflective of gradual improvement. Step by step development of the work will be assessed in all units.
Components of a Portfolio:
•  Schedule of work
• Research Skills
• Resources and materials
• Study of connections with artists I art movements
• Art making skills
•  Personal artist statement
• Studies (e. g.,composition/ techniques-medium)
• Picture of the final work (reflective skills)
• Evaluation of final work (affective skills)
• Any kind of personalized notes in relation to art work
Profile of Learners Growth
Values and Attitudes Rubric
The learner develops the ability to :
•  Respect, appreciate and demonstrate an open mind towards the artistic expression of others
•  Appears enthusiastic and willing to study artistic expressions from other cultures or regions of the world that are very different from own.
• Accept different forms and styles and tries to explore their meaning.
• Be sensitive towards other’s creations
• Be ready to research and transfer his/ herlearning to his I her own art
• Take initiative
• Be responsible for his/ her own learning and progress
• Apply theoretical knowledge in practical contexts
• Possess information and communication technology skills
• Be resourceful and organize information effectively
• Listen attentively
CBSE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT FOR FINE ARTS MAY BE DONE
ON THE BASIS OF FOLLOWING CRITERIA
Creativity: Candidates are required to produce evidence that demonstrates a creative approach to problem­
solving. Evidence should also include the ability to interpret a given brief and original approaches to produce    a solution . Sketchbooks, notebooks and relevant support material should form part of this evidence.
1.  Drawing
2.   Detailed Study – observation, record,analysis, interpreting a variety of subject 3.  Mood reflected
4.    Follow-up of the Fundamentals of VisualArts (Elements and Principles)
5.  Message the artist wants to convey
Innovation: The knowledge gained with the help of case study (historical importance, great artist work).
How has the above been understood in relation to the topic or the theme taken up by the student?
Technique: To foster creativity and self expression (basic understanding of colour concept and application in
relation to colour and texture of the material used by the student).  Size, details, proportion required
according to the base used for the painting medium chosen according to their art stream. Techniques studied from folk style, contemporary art or traditional art should be used while creating a new concept.
The learners:
•  Discover their potential for creativity, self -expression and visual awareness through painting.
• Feel confident with the chosen medium as a means of communicating and generating ideas.
• Develop observation, recording, manipulation and application skills.
• Experiment with a range of media and techniques.
• Relate their work to other artists work and understand the historical context of this work.
• Understand the basic principles of colour.
• Develop critical awareness.
Execution of Work
• Highlight the method of work giving a historical study of the work.
•  Originality in the presentation (paintings, sketches, etc.)
• Demonstrate an understanding of basic colour principles, colour mixing and representation.
•  Employ a variety of traditional and experimental techniques and processes
• Use a variety of media and materials
• Observe, record, analyse, interpret a variety of subjects, including : the manufactured environment
the natural environment the human figure
• Present evidence of personal enquiry and self expression
•  Discuss and relate own work to recognize artists work
•  Observe colour in other craft and design areas
•  Make informed critical judgement on work in progress
Experimentation
A. Progressive Work: Candidates are required to show evidence of research carried out. It is expected that their skills will demonstrate evidence of process and the exploration of a wide range of subjects. An accepted standard of achievement using a range of media and material should be an integral part of the candidate’s development.
B.   Skills: Sound aesthetic judgement  and organizational skills should be demonstrated in the process of work presented by a candidate.
C.    Logical organization and collection of creations.
D.  Critical evaluation and aesthetic judgement applied.
(A) PAINTING CBSE
(Code No. 049)
Introduction: The course in Painting at Senior Secondary stage as an elective subject is aimed to develop
aesthetic sense of the students through the understanding of various important well known aspects and modes of visual art expression in India’s rich cultural heritage from the period of Indus valley to the present time. It also encompasses practical exercises in drawing and painting to develop their mental faculties of
observation, imagination,creation and physical skills required for its expressions.
ObJKt_IVH
A)  Thtr0ry. (Hlncry of lnct11nAnJ
Tlne qbject:ive of imcluding ilhe history cf lmdian .Art tor the stuclents is. to familiar-Ee t’h!em with he vanous. styl.M: and m di art itXJiWM!iiOM 1.-onn ditl.-t parun1 ll!lllia.ih1!i wllt!J d @nriri:h lthmrvismn1 8lild enable them to appred:ar, e Mid de-velop :m r.iesllhetk sensibility to enJCJll the be111.1ty of’ nature and
-life. The :5tudenUwill al haYe 1:1n o.g:)Qrtunrt to    raind $tudy the evolAJrt;ICJ!!l of tu 11’1111te.Uon5o a_nd
$)!iltlilest s wi!U’I Dtli\ier style and ·tfile rise of am *ther .mew styt.e.The $W(‘.lemts. should be mac!le aware o1an as .a ooman experience.The teachers :thowld be able to tthem ·to the wide Fafllle of a«tn1c 11115, nhe mei;tia and the toolis 1!15ed.The lnl  of lndln art i”:s. a to11g one. H   e the stuclenU w<00ld be aaJllllaimted wilt! brief pi  af the develuprmem  Df Imdiam ·vi:5l!li!I art as are. requ red fo.­ allna’pt fomriarton. E:xr.ilflplcs iiKludcd In he cCH.ne- al study me selectt:d bec111use of heir ;nes.thttic:
4l1U11Ut1  imd arel111tended purely eriruidellnei.
B  Pltdk:al.s
11’111 purpose <Of nntrodLKinl practrcal.   rat ‘ill paTi’tl ng Is °’ 11.tp and i!i’latu tlhe luMnt.s:
–  Te de’ielQp. sklU iof l.!i1ns. d        and p:a.1nt nit.erlaL (suna.oe, t.oolJ .and ·eqwlpment. ·etc:.)
effectively.
Ifci sharpen 1h11r1rr obsMva-llon •n !through study of canmon objKU Mid v-M’IOUs. poml!ltrfcd and
noo-etrlcal forms fom!il •Ufe and notwre.
–  l’ develOP hleir 5li: U5o w draw :and  i11t the QbrvaUons-
–   Tc de-‘w’el ill’I 1l!lmder$tandlmg of pa.i nU!if.R·l!:amoo (The ILl5e of tfile e enments !allld ihe prlociples of
pa1111tJng -oompos tiOl!I•.
–   l”t!J  itreaw   hie fonmlii  anfj the ad.our”        mes.in innaghnaUon with ilfl ibitttylo ei:Pfies5 Uiem
eneoc::tivet;,r in drawfng aoo painti ng.
Tei 8PMS!!!i thfr d.IUl!lntRt fiM!irngs Md        sf Lif’• nd mt.ml’ n Lms, formsand colourrs.
One Tl’le.Oly Paper
Uttitw’lse ‘W-e’i
CLASS-XI(THEORY) (2018′-19)
1(Cod1t No.. 049)
40 Man:s
Time 2 Hoors
Un tsPeriods.Miark!.
History o:f rmttan Arl:
1Pre-1-listorlr:: roc:k r>ainl:hg§; aoo art ofIn   Valleyn.‘1t)
2Buddhist.. Ja’n and H1111du .A.rt2415
3Ti!rflple 5′;u ptur1M1 Br'(lnzt!s snd Artirtit:: at.$ ‘1f h’M:IO> l.amii:
:arcl”ltteeture
l615
71’40
Unit 1:  Pre-hfstorlc Ro.ck PalntJnp and Art of llndl!ls V lley
(2    B.·C. m ·1500 B.C..
12 Periods
Introduction
1)   Period and Location
2)   Study of following Pre-historic paintings:
(i) A Roaring Animal, Bhimbethaka (ii) Wizard’s Dance, Bhimbethaka
B.   Introduction
(i)  Period and Location.
(ii) Extension: In about 1500 miles
(a)  Harappa & Mohenjo-daro (Now in Pakistan)
(b) Ropar, Lothal, Rangpur, Alamgirpur, Kali Bangan, Banawali and Dholavira (in India)
2.  Study of following: Sculptures and Terracottas
(i)  Dancing girl (Mohenjo-daro) Bronze, 10.5 x 5 x 2.5 cm.
Circa 2500 B.C.
(Collection: National Museum, New Delhi).
(ii)  Male Torso (Harappa)
Red lime Stone, 9.2 x 5.8 x 3 ems.
Circa 2500 B.C.
(Collection: National Museum, New Delhi).
(iii) Mother Goddess (Mohenjo-daro) terracotta, 22 x 8 x 5 cm. Circa 2500 B.C. (Collection: National Museum, New Delhi).
3.  Study of following Seal:
(i)   Bull (Mohenjo-daro)
Stone (Steatite), 2.5 x 2.5 x 1.4 cm.
Circa 2500 B.C. (Collection: National Museum, New Delhi). Decoration on earthen wares:
(i)   Painted earthen-ware (Jar) Mohenjo-daro
(Collection:  National Museum, New Delhi).
Unit 2:   Buddhist, Jain and Hindu Art
(3rd century B.C. to 8th century A.O.)
24 Periods
1)   General Introduction to Art during Mauryan, Shunga, Kushana (Gandhara and Mathura styles)
and Gupta period:
2)   Study of following Sculptures:
i)  Lion Capital from Sarnath (Mauryan period) Pol shed sandstone,
370
Circa 3rd Century B.C.
(Collection: Sarnath Museum, U.P.)
ii)  Chauri Bearer from Didar Ganj (Yakshi) (Mauryan period) Polished sandstone
Circa 3rd Century B.C.
(Collection: Patna Museum, Bihar)
iii) Bodhisattva head from Taxila (Kushan period-Gandhara style) Stone, 27.5 x 20 x 15c.m.
Circa 2nd Century A.D.
(Collection: National Museum, New Delhi)
iv)  Seated Buddha from Katra Mound, Mathura-(Kushan Period-Mathura Style) Red-spotted Sand Stone, Circa 3rd Century AD.
(Collection: Govt. Museum, Mathura)
v)    Seated Buddha from Sarnath (Gupta period) Stone
Circa 5th century AD
(Collection: Sarnath Museum U.P.)
vi)   Jain Tirathankara (Gupta period) Stone
Circa 5th Century A.D.
(Collection: State Museum, Lucknow U. P.)
3)   Introduction to Ajanta
Location, period,  No.  of  caves,  Chaitya  and  Vihara, paintings and sculptures,  subject­ matter and technique etc.
4)   Study of Following Painting and Sculpture:
(i) Padmapani Bodhisattva (Ajanta Cave No. I, Maharashtra) Mural Painting
Circa 5th Century A.D.
(ii) Mara Vijay (Ajanta Cave No. 26) Sculpturein stone.
Circa 5th Century A .D.
Unit 3: Temple Sculpture, Bronzes and artistic aspects of lndo-lslamic Architectu re 36 Periods
A)  Artistic aspects of Indian Temple sculpture
(6th Century A. D. to 13th Century A.D. )
(1)  Introduction to Temple Sculpture
(6th Century A. D. to 13th Century A.D. )
12 Periods
371
(2)  Study of following Temple-Sculptures;
(i)  Descent  of  Ganga  (Pallava  period,  Mahabalipuram, Tamil  Nadu),  granite rock Circa 7th Century A.O.
(ii) Ravana shaking Mount Kailash (Rashtrakuta period, Ellora, Maharashtra) Stone
8th Century A. O.
(iii)Trimurti (Elephanta, Maharashtra) Stone
Circa 9th Century A.O.
(iv)Lakshmi  Narayana (Kandariya Mahadev Temple)  (Chandela period,  Khajuraho, Madhya Pradesh)
Stone
Circa 10th Century A.O.
(v) Cymbal Player, Sun Temple (Ganga Dynasty, Konark, Odisha) Stone
Circa 13th Century A. D.
(vi)  Mother and Child (Vimal-Shah Temple, Solanki Dynasty, Dilwara , Mount Abu, Rajasthan) white marble.
Circa 13th Century A. D.
(B) Bronzes:
(1) Introduction to Indian Bronzes
(2) Method of casting (solid and hollow)
(3)  Study of following south Indian Bronzes:
(i)   Nataraj (Chola period Thanjavur Distt., Tamil Nadu) 12th Century A .O.
(Collection: National Museum, New Delhi.) (ii) Devi (Uma) Chola Period
11th Century A. D.
(Collection: National Museum, New Delhi.)
12 Periods
(C)  Artistic aspects of the lndo-lslamic architecture
(1)   Introduction
(2) Study of following architectures:
(i)   Qutab Minar, Delhi (ii) Taj Mahal,Agra
(iii) Gol Gumbad , Bijapur
12 Periods
372
CLASS-X I{2G11-19)
(PRA.CTICAL}
60      1t5
Time 6 Hoblrs C:bl
UnitsPoriadsMarla
1N:rl.unt and Objed Studysazo
2Painting.• CampO’§.ition50ID
3Portfolio As“8lD
1″41660
Unit 1; Nature . nd Objec.t ‘Study                                                               20 M.!!rks 50 Periods
Stucbr of·lWO «three not.lftl and aoornet.nc fomn 1n perncil W’lth 1iht 1nd shade from 11 fixed point of ·view’. H’atural fooms ike plants, v t l::lles,fruits a!ild iflcrwell’S , etc.;are to be l.11$ed. Gemmetri:ca fMms of ob’[email protected]@ 1:1lJb1u, OOl’IM) prisrvu:, <CY{tndenaind !!ipMrK !Mulid Mi lMld.
Unit 1; Painting Composition                                                          20 Marks 50 Perliods
UJ Sfmple eK5e5 gf ba”$ic; de$ign irn varnatfQll of s.eorrnet ril; a_nd rhytbmail:: pe5 in SE!!!llliletllicalamd decoratrve desipils ama oolouirs to IDier.iltand des!Sns as organised v’!s1.11al Ul”an;erne111ts.                                                                               1OMarkt: 25 Periods
Ur.It l= PortfOllo Assessment                                                              20 Marks 48 Periods
tt)   Recor<.I or h& ifttln!!     ,.prformana!i frriom sketch to ‘filll prt.      10·.¥!3rb
b  Five             l”!at\Jre arid ob.lect 5-tU!il).r        rd5e5 in iiiDY media       · cbing the 5e5Pon
includins mimirmum al      stll lrifE e  lidses;.                                                                         05 Mairb
c)  iwo M w.orll:s. of P3fntln15!!i [email protected] c*Jrlng tiht!i YNr                                    O!ii Marks These selecredl works prepared dunhne: lihe c:ourse by ·ttte cand1dat.es a111d rertlfied by lhe
sohlooll authcriti’e.s as the wt1rk dbne m the 5Chool wiill be placed behw”e tlrie exam1men for
M!Msrnf!nt .
Note:  1. The c:andicla 9 mould be !ifven one hCll.l”-breok after fl,_ hree haurs.
1. The time-table to be 50 f ramed lo llQ’!i’!il the 5tudeou t.oi wuk aintilnl.DJ5t:.’ for m1n1mum of
two pll’liOds at a     Uli.
One Theary Papeli
W’lirw.u••w:mlif\tago
PAllNTING (Code No 049)
CLUS-Xll 1(2018-19)
(THEORY)
..f 0 Marks
Timo: :2: Hoors
UnitsPeriod’sMarls
1The Rajasthani and Pah.ari Si!:hmol!S. af Miniabre Paint ngt Rc10
1The Mugha.• am:! lleca,n Si;hoo’, Qf Miniature- Paimt(ng1810
3Thelmdf i!n Ni-!1ioAal Rag ancJ the El;englSi;hl;ll;llQf Pa11nti1810
4The Modem Trel!ids In lndlan Art1810
71“‘°
Ulnlt 1: The Rajasthlnl and Paharl Schools of M niature Palnt1n1
(6.., Cent.wy A.ID.to 19th CM’lllllll} A..D.)
A brr1eJ n rocihJi:tion t.o. nd1en Mklfan.-e Sc:hoot’5i: Westem· lndran. Pala,. .ajMthan1, Muah:al, Centra lndli:!, Dea;an.and hhari.
The RaJM’tharri schi»J=
(i) Onlii!lin and Development
(2) Swb-Sch®·Mew.-,Bund Jodlpuir. B1kcaner, lt   s-h emd Jip1i1r·
( ) Main fealLJl’K of thit!’ bjM!ihitni Schod
(‘4)  Stud or tl’le f01.low1ni R:aljMlhan1paEnt11\iS:
Titll.e
ManMlag!nii
MJ 11.rninilddh  s.rng.n tw’8.
Cl’laupn Pal !r’ers
Krisl’ns ao swimg
RM!hi!!J (Bn1·Thmil)
Bharat Meets Rama al Chhlra.lcuta
Painter
Utka Ram Dana INurudc:li’n NrMl ll:hmid
CitJman
llllndl
JodM  r
Ritaner
l<ii ShmigMh
Jl:1pu-
B “lihe Pahari Scl
(I) Ori!:in and di!<relopmoot
(2) Sul:rSchoob·BMol’IU. Guter1  Kan ra. Chamblj and Garhw
(l) Nim featuire Qf the Pahari Sdloo1
(4) Stnctr or the r-allOWii n Pahati paintings:;
Th/lei
Kr151illlilli Vlllti (iop15 B’lilarat Wtwshippi!ilg
Paint.
ManaJi:u
sIi.th-SchCICI
Li
Charan_Padukas of Rama
Cosmic Dance of Shiva Nand, Yashoda and Krishna with Kinsmen going to Vrindavana
Radha and Krishna Looking into the Mirror
Unknown
Unknown
Nainsukh Unknown
Guler
Chamba
Kangra Garhwal
Unit 2:  The Mughal and Deccan Schools of Miniature Painting
(16th Century AD to 19th Century A.D.)
(A) The Mughal School
(1)  Origin and development
(2)  Main features of the Mughal School
(3)  Study of the following Mughal Paintings:
18 Periods
Title
Krishna  Lifting Mount  Govardhana Babur Crossing the River Sone
Jahangir Holding the Picture of Madona Falcon on a Bird- Rest
Kabir and Raidas
Marriage procession of Dara Shikoh
(B) The Deccan School
(1)  Origin and development
(2)  Main features of the Deccan School
(3)  Study of the following Deccan Paintings:
Title
Ragini Pat-hamsika
Sultan Abdulla Qutb Shah
Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya and Amir Khusro Dancers
Chand Bibi Playing Polo (Chaugan)
Painter
Miskin Jagnath Abul Hassan
Ustad Mansoor Ustad Faquirullah Khan
Haji Madni
Painter
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown
Unknown
Period
Akbar Akbar Jahangir Jahangir Shahjahan
Provincial Mughal
(Avadh)
Sub-School
Ahmadnagar Bijapur Hyderabad Hyderabad
Gol Konda
Unit 3:   The Indian National Flag and the Bengal School of Painting
(About the beginning to mid of the 20th Centuary)
18 Periods
(A)  Evolution of the  Indian National  Flag  (First  –  1906, Middle –  1921 and  Final 1947 stages);
Symbolic significance of its forms and the colours.
(B) (1) Introduction to the Bengal School of Painting
One Pr.ac. til:::am Paper
LJ’j!JlfWl!.e W:Mgi’1tq&
PArNmtiiG Code Ho. 049)
CLHS-Xll {201S-19) (PRAC”mCM.)
60 Marks
TiiM: 6. Hm.ll’Si (3.+ll
UnitlPeriodsMarki
1tqaturn and Object Study5020
2.Painting Composition5020
lP-onfO!lio      men111820
148.l!JO
St.ud’6s om Ii.he batls. of ex:ercbes dl!lne n d:ass XI with two or three objeicuand two draperies. (In
different w) for badiJOUrnd arndl focegroumd.Exerdse5:irn pelllCi with llg:ht amd shade and It
full 1Col.ou1T from a fiiced po1nt.of view.
1m111rnat1¥e pafntlns b-ued on subjects rrom Life and N1u, ll.l’fe or Natu11e rn walef” and poster
…:o.lo.un wlttl ool.oUJr   lue!.
Unit J: PwttoHo As.sessment
(a) Reeord 01′ the entire y.E’i.f’s perifo.rma111C.ll’ from ste d’I to ftn’JWcl pro.d.lcl .
(b) FI”VE!  58Kied na u1re andl  abject:  §Cjl!Jdy   exerckes in  any  media   done· dn.-ing  the  sessiom,
includJns m1m1rnurn of tW’O stlll [email protected]           sM.                                                       !ii     lb (c• Two seleclt.ed wuks or pirintln11done by dle candidate duriot the     Ii                      s IMfks, These seleded worb pre;pared dl!lriq the course 17t· tlhe candidate arid certified ti,i the school iWthtwUIMM IMwrirlik domt! iill th!! :!!Z:lnll’.ld. ‘1i’ll’lilbl!!           [email protected] tlw! f!’xamlntn for aMnwmt.
lllcte:     The tJme-e to be so fmned mto allow tine lt!Jdents. to wort contlnuoo,!J.y for minimum or two
per1    al, i!J :Stfetdl.
1. Markin1Sdhiim.
Pin I: Naliunand Object Study,
(i)     Drawfng (composlticm)                                                                                  10
( i)  TrNtment ol nwdfttlt:ol.Cld’I                                                                 05
(111) 0vera1111mpre- ssm                                                                       05
Part 11  Pi!intlnt – Composition
(ii    COilnjXt$itioma• a,!Ffi’ili’ll!l!M’Mli\t il’ltludiJ’ij                Oli’I tht wtrject.
[ilj Treatment of IN!’dl (coloor’J 21nd apprcpriatemloor sclneme. (“ii }   Orlgi’nal ty. aeatlvity al’ld qve;raH ·irnpras,ian
10
05
(15
2{1 lilllilrks.
(i)   Origin and development of the Bengal School of Painting
(ii) Main features of the Bengal School of Painting
(2) Contribution of Indian artists in the struggle for National Freedom Movement
(3)  Study of the following paintings of the Bengal school:
(i)  Journey’s End – Abanindranath Tagore (ii) Shiva and Sati-Nandalal Bose
(iii) Rasa-Lila – Kshitindranath Majumdar
(iv) Radhika – M.A.R. Chughtai
(v)  Meghdoot – Ram Gopal Vijaivargiya
Unit 4:The Modern Trends in Indian Art                                                             18 Periods
Introduction
(1)  Study of the following works of Contemporary (Modern) Indian Art
(a)  Paintings
(i)  Rama Vanquishing the Pride of the Ocean – Raja Ravi Varma (ii) Magician – Gaganendranath Tagore
(iii) Mother and child – Jamini Roy
(iv) Three Girls – Amrita Sher Gil
(v) Mother Teressa – M.F. Husain
(vi) Gossip – N.S. Bendre
(vii) Untitled – G.R. Santosh
(b) Graphic – prints:
(i)   Whirl pool – Krishna Reddy (ii) Children – Somnath Hore (iii) Devi – Jyoti Bhatt
(iv) Of Walls – Anupam Sud
(v) Man, Woman and Tree – K. Laxma Goud
(c)  Scupltures:
(i)  Triumph of Labour – D. P. Roychowdhury (ii)  Santhal Family – Ramkinkar Vaij
(iii) Cries Un – heard – Amar Nath Sehgal
(iv) Ganesha – P.V. Jankiram
(v)  Chatturmukhi – Aekka Yada Giri Rao
The names of artists and titles of their art work as listed above are only suggestive and in no way
exhaustive. Teachers and students should expand this according to their own resources. However, the questions willbe set from the above mentioned art-works only.
Part Ill: Portfol o Assessment
(a)    Record of the entire year’s performance from sketch to finished product
(b)  Five selected nature and object study exercises in any media including minimum of two still lives
(c)    Two selected painting compositions prepared on the basis of
life and nature
20 marks
10
05
05
2.   Format of the Questions:
Part I: Nature and Object Study
Draw and paint the still·life of a group of objects arranged on a drawing board before you, from a fixed point of view (given to you), on a drawing paper of half imperial size in colours. Your drawing should be proportionate to the size of the paper. The objects should be painted in realistic manner with proper light and shade and perspective, etc. In this study the drawing· board is not to be included.
Note : A group of objects to be decided by the external and internal examiners jointly as per instructions. The objects for nature study and object study are to be arranged before the candidates .
Part II: Painting Composition:
Make a painting ·composition on any of the following five subjects in any medium (water /pastel, tempera, acrylic) of your choice on a drawing-paper of half imperial size either horizontally or vertically. Your composition should be original and effective. Weightage will be given to a well creative  composed   drawing,  effective   use  of  media,  proper   emphasis  on  the  subject matter  and utilization of full-space.
Note: Any five subjects for  painting composition are to be decided by the external and internal
examiners jointly as per instructions and are to mentioned here strictly just before the start of the examination for part II.
3.  (A) Instructions for the selection of the objects for Nature and Object Study:
1. The examiners (Internal and External) are to select/decide two or three suitable objects in such a way so that natural and geometricalforms may be coveredin the group of objects:
(i)      Natural-forms-large size foliage and flowers, fruits, and vegetables, etc.
(ii)   Geometrical forms made of wood/plastic /paper/metal/earthen, etc., such as cube, cone, prism, cylinder and sphere.
2.  Objects should be selected generally of large (suitable) size.
3. An object relating to nature, according to the season and location of the examination centre, must be included in the group of objects. The natural-objects should be purchased/ arranged only on the day of the examination so that its freshness may be maintained.
4. Two draperies in different colours (one in dark and other in light tone) are also to be included for background and foreground, keeping in view the colours and tones of the objects selected.
(B)  Instructions to decide the subjects for Painting-Composition:
1.  The examiners (Internal and External) are to select/decide five subjects suitable for painting – composition.
2. The subjects should be so designed that the candidates may get clear -cut ideas of the subjects
and they can exercise their imagination freely, because it is not important what you do, but how you do it.
3.  The examiners (Internal and External) jointly are free to select/ decide the subjects, but these should be accordingto the standard of Class XIIand environment of the school/candidates.
Some identified areas of the subjects for painting-composition are given below, in which some more areas may also be added:
(i)   Affairs of family friends and daily life. (ii)  Affairs of family professionals.
(iii) Games and sports activities.
(iv)  Nature
(v)   Fantasy
(vi)  National, religious, cultural, historical and social events and celebrations.
4.  General Instructions to the examiners:
1.  Candidates should be given one hour break after first three hours.
2.   Work of the candidates, for Parts I, II and 111, are to be evaluated on the spot jointly by the external and internal  examiners.
3.   Each work of Part I, II and 111, after assessment is to be marked as “Examined” and duly signed by the external  and internal examiners jointly.
Some Reference Books for teachers (For Practical Part):
1.   “Paint Still life” by Claretta White yet to be revised (Walter T. Foster Publication).
2.   “Art of Drawing” Grumbacher Library Wook (Walter T. Foster Publication).
3.   “On Techniques” By Leon Frank (Walter T. Foster Publication).
4.    “More Trees” by Fredrick Gardner (Walter T. Foster Publ cation).
5.   “How to Draw and Paint Textures of Animals” By Walter J. Wilweding (Water T. Foster Publication).
6.   “How to Draw and Paint Animal Expressions” by Walter J. Wilweding (Walter T. Foster Publ cation).
7.   “Art of the Pencil” by Borough Johnson (Sir ISAAC Pitman & Sons Ltd., New Delhi).
8.  “Design for you” by Ethel Jane Beitler (John Wilary & Sons Ltd., New Delhi).
9.   “Complete Book of Artist’s Techniques by Dr. Kurt Herbers, (Thames and Hudson, London).
B. GRAPHICS
(Code No. 050)
Introduction: The Course in Graphics at Senior Secondary stage as an elective subject is aimed to develop aesthetic sense of the students through the understanding of various important, well known aspects and modes of Visual art expression in India’s rich cultural heritage from the period of Indus Valley to the present time. It encompasses also a wider range of practical exercises in making of graphic prints for developing their mental faculties of observation, imagination,creation and physical & technical skills.
Objectives
A)   Theory (History of Indian Art)
Note: As the syllabus of Graphics (Theory) is the same as that of Painting (Theory), its objectives are same.
B)  Practical
The purpose of introducing practical exercises in graphics is to help and enable students to make simple compositions in monochrome and in colours through the various print-making techniques using methods and material specifically prescribed for adequate results. The students should be introduced to the subject by giving a short history of the print making techniques. They should be given exercises to inculcate respect for the tools and apparatus-used in the various processes including their maintenance
and proper handling.
One Theory Paper
Unitwise Weightage
CLASS-XI (THEORY)
40 Marks
Time: 2 Hours
UnitsPeriodsMarks
History of Indian Art
1Pre-Historic Rock-Paintings and Art of Indus Valley1210
2Buddhist and Jain and Hindu Art2415
3Temple  Sculptures,  Bronzes  and  Artistic  aspects  of  lndo-  Islamic Architecture3615
7240
Notes: The Syllabus of Graphics (Theory) for Class XI is the same as that of Painting (Theory) for class XI
given earlier.
One Practical Paper
Unitwise Weightage
CLASS-XI (PRACTICAL)
60 Marks
Time: 6 Hours (3+3)
UnitsPeriodsMarks
1Relief Printing through Linocut/Woodcut/Paper-cardboard10040
2Portfolio Assessment4820
14860
Unit 1: To make Linocut/Woodcut/Paper -cardboard print on  1/4 Imperial sheet on a
given subject Syllabus for Rel ef Printing (Lonocuts/Woodcuts/Pape r-cardboard Prints).                                                                                               100 Periods
1.   Introduction of the history of print making.
2.   Printing methods and materials.
3.    Characteristics of printing inks, solvents, and dyers.
4.    Registration methods.
5.   Simple, colour printing techniques.
6.   Finishing of the mounting and prints.
Unit 2:Portfolio Assessment48 Periods
a)    Record of the entire year’s performance from sketch to finished product10 Marks
b)   The selected prints (either from Linocuts/Woodcuts/ Paper-cardboard prints) prepared during
the course by the candidate and certified by the school authorities as the work done in the school are to be placed before the examiners for assessment.                                   10 Marks
Note:
1.   The candidates should be given one hour break after first three hours.
2.   The time-table to be so framed as to allow the students to work continuously for minimum of two periods at a stretch.
One Theory Paper
Unitwise Weightage
CLASS-XII (THEORY)
40 Marks
Time: 2 Hours
UnitsPeriodsMarks
History of Indian Art
1The Rajasthani and Pahari Schools of Miniature Painting1810
2The Mughal and Deccan schools of Miniature Painting1810
3The Indian National Flag and the Bengal School of Painting1810
4The Modern Trends in Indian Art1810
7240
Note: The Syllabus of Graphics (Theory) for Class XII is the same as that of Painting (Theory) for class XII
given earlier.
One Practical Paper
Unitwise Weightage
CBSE CLASS-XII (PRACTICAL)
60 Marks
Time: 6 Hours (3+3)
UnitsPeriodsMarks
1Making of  graphic-print through  Serigraphy/Lithography/Etchi ng and10040
Engraving (Intaglio Process) techniques
24820
Portfolio Assessment14860
Note: The students in the class are expecte d to opt for any one of the fo llowing media depend ing upon
the facilities available in their schools.                                                                            120 Periods
Unit-1   a)  Serigraphy
1.   The history of stencils and silk screen.
2.  Methods and materials.
3.   The use and maintenance of the squeeze.
4.   Sealing, registration for colour,work and preparation for printing.
5.    Solvents for cleaning, use and characteristics of printing inks.
6.   Finishing and mounting of the print.
OR
b)   Lithography                                                                                                            100 Periods
1.  Introduction: Short history and the methods and material used in producing lithographic prints.
2.  The use and characteristics of the Litho stone/ Zinc plates.
3.  The use of lithographic chalks and ink (Tusche).
4.    Preparing for printing and use of various chemicals inking and taking proofs.
5.   Papers used in lithography and getting the final print.
6.   Finishing and mounting of the print.
OR
c)   Etching and Engraving (Intagl o Process)                                                                    120 Periods
1. Introduction to intaglio technique with a short history, methods and materials, Etching process.
2. Preparing the plate and laying the ground (resist) and Inking.
3.  Characteristics of different types of grounds.
4. Characteristics and use of various acids.
5. Colour etching, use of stencils and marks.
6. Finishing and mounting of the prints.
Unit 2:   oprd of the entire year’s performance from sketch to finished product                               10 Marks
b)   Three selected prints prepared during the course by the candidate and certified by the school
authorities  as works  done in the school and  to be  placed  before the external examiner for assessment.                                                                                                                       10 Marks
Note: The time table to be so framed as to allow the students to work continuously for minimum of two
periods at a stretch.
GUIDELINES FOR EVALUATION OF PRACTICAL
1.  Marking Scheme:
Part I:  Graphic-Composition (print making)
(i)  Emphasis on the subject
(ii) Handling on the material and technique of print·making (iii) Composition and quality of print
10
10        40 marks 20
Part II: Portfolio Assessment
(a)  Record of the entire year’s performance from sketch to finished product.     10
(b)  Three selected Prints (4+3+3 marks for 3 prints)                                             10
2.  Format of the questions:
Part I:   Graphic Composition (print-making)                                                                             50 marks
Choose one of the print-making medium available and taught in your school viz. serigraphy, lithography, etching and engraving.
Make a Graphic-Composition on any one of the five subjects given below according to the possibility and suitability of the medium:
(Note: Any five suitable subjects for “Graphic-Composition (Print-making)” are to be decided by the internal and external  examiners jointly in accordance with the instructions are to be mentioned here).
Make use of line, tone and texture, exploiting the medium fully to realize composition. Print your composition in one or two colours.
Pay special attention to print quality and cleanliness. Submit two identical prints along with all the roughlayouts as your final submission.
Size of the plate:
(i) Serigraphy
(ii) Lithography
(iii) Etching ft engraving
30 cm x 20 cm.
30 cm x 20 cm.
30 cm x 20 cm.
3.  Instructions to decide the subjects for Graphic – Composition:
1. The external and internal examiners jointly are to select/ decide five subjects suitable for Graphic­ Composition (print-making).
2. Each subject should be so designed that the candidate may get a clear -cut idea of the subject, however, any candidate can perceive a subject in his/ her own way but graphic quality must be maintained in the composition.
3. The examiners (Internal and External) are free to select/decide the subjects, but these should be according to the standard of class XI I and environment of the school/candidates.
Some identified areas of the subjects for Graphic-Composition (Print-making) are given below in which some more areas may be added, if needed:
(i)      Affairs of family, friends and daily life.
(ii)    Affairs of family professionals.
(iii)  Games & Sports Activities.
(iv)    Nature.
(v)     Fantasy.
(vi)   National, religious and cultural, historical and social events and celebrations. (vii)  Historical monuments
(viii) Folk and classical dances/theatres
(ix)     Traditional/ancient sculpture and painting
(x)     Relevant social issues
4.  Instructions to the examiners
1.   Candidates should be given one hour break after first three hours.
2.   Work of the candidates for part I & II is to be evaluated on the spot by the external and internal examiners jointly.
3.   Each work of parts I & 11, after assessment, is to be marked as examined and duly signed by the external and internal examiners.
Some Reference books for teachers
1. “The Techniques of Graphic Art”, by H. Van Kruihingen.
2.    “Print Making”, Harvewy Daniels (Hamlym).
3.   “Art is Manual for Silk Screen Print Making”, by Heavy Shackler.
4.    “Print Making Today”, by Jules Helles.
5.   “Silk Screen Techniques”, J.I. Biege Leison, Dover Publ cation, New York.
6.  “Introducing Screen Printing”, Anthony Kinsey Walson Guptill, New York.
7.   “The Art and Craft of Screen Process Printing”, Kosloff,All the Bruce Publishing Co., New York.
8.   “Practical Screen Printing”, Stephen Russ, Studio Vista Walson Auptill, New York.
9.   “Artists Manual for Silk, Screen Print making”, Harry Shekler, American Artist’s Group’ New York.
10. “Lithography”, Yau Nostrav, Reinnold.
11. “Lithography for Artists”, Standley Loues, Oxford University Press.
12. “Linocuts and Woodcuts” ,Michael Rothemstein Studio Vista, London.
13.  “Relief Printing”, Michael Rothenstein Studio Vista, London.
14. “Etching, Engraving and Intagl o Printing”,Anthony Gross, Oxford University Press.
15. “The Art of Etching”, E.S. Sumaden Gouslable, London.
(C) SCULPTURE
(Code No. 051)
Introduction
The Course in sculpture at Senior Secondary stage as an elective subject is aimed at developing aesthetic sense of the students through the understanding of various important, well known aspects and modes of visual art expression in India’s rich cultural heritage from the period of Indus Valley to the present time. It encompasses also a wide range of practical exercises in making of various sculptures for developing their
mental faculties of observation, imagination and creation and the physical and technical skills.
Objectives
A)  THEORY (History of Indian Art)
Note: As the syllabus of Sculpture (Theory) is the same as that of Painting (Theory), its objectives are same.
B) PRACTICAL
The purpose of introducing practical exercises in sculpture is to help and enable the students to make sculptures. All assignments should be designed to understand problems of volume, weight, play of form in space, etc ., as against rendering on flat two dimensional. Adequate technical skills may be provided
depending on the facilities available.
CLASS-XI  (THEORY)
One Theory Paper
Unitwise Weightage
40 Marks
Time: 2 Hours
UnitsPeriodsMarks
History of Indian Art
1Pre-Historic Rock-Painting and Art of Indus Valley1210
2Buddhist, Jain and Hindu Art2415
3Temple Sculpturs,  Bronzes and Artistic aspects of  lndo-lslamic Architecture3615
7240
Note: The Syllabus of Sculpture (Theory) for Class XI is the same as that of Painting (Theory) for Class XI
given earlier.
CLASS-XI  (PRACTICAL)
One Practical Paper
Unitwise Weightage
60 Marks
Time: 6 Hours (3+3)
UnitsPeriodsMarks
1Modelling in Relief (in clay or plaster of Paris)5020
2Modelling in Round (in clay or plaster of Paris)5020
3       I Portfolio Assessment                                                                                   48                  20
148               60
Unit 1: Modelling in relief on given subjects from life and nature.
Unit 2: Model ing in round on given subjects from life and nature.
Handling of clay and its techniques, pinching, coiling, rolling, etc.
Unit 3: Portfolio Assessment
50 Periods
50 Periods
48 Periods
a)   Record the entire year’s performance from sketch to finished product.                             10 Marks
b) Four selected pieces of works prepared during the course by the candidate and certified by the school authorities as works executed in the school are to be placed before the examiners for assessment .                                                                                                     10 Marks
Note: 1.   The candidate should be given one hour break after first three hours.
2.    The time table to be so framed as to allow the students to work continuously for minimum of two periods at a stretch.
One Theory Paper
Unitwise Weightage
CLASS-XII (THEORY)
40 Marks
Time: 2 Hours
UnitsPeriodsMarks
CBSE History of Indian Art
1The Rajasthani and Pahari Schools of Miniature Painting1810
2The Mughal and Deccan Schools of Miniature Painting1810
3The Indian National Flag and the Bengal School of Painting1810
4The Modern Trends in Indian Art1810
7240
Note: The Syllabus of Sculpture (Theory) for Class XII is the same as that of Painting (Theory) for Class XII
given earlier.
One Paper
Unitwise Weightage
CLASS-XI I (PRACTICAL)
60 Marks
Time: 6 Hours (3+3)
UnitsPeriodsMarks
1Modelling in Relief (Clay and plaster of Paris)5020
2Modelling in Round (clay and plaster of Paris5020
3Portfolio Assessment4820
14860
Unit 1: Modelling in Relief*
Unit 2: Modelling in Round*
Unit 3: Portfolio Assessment
50 Pds.
50 Pds.
48 Pds.
(a)  Record of the entire year’s performance from sketch to finished product                    (10 Marks)
(b) Four pieces of work prepared during the course selected by the candidate and certified by the school authorities as work executed in the school are to be placed before the examiners for assessment.
Use of clay composition in hollow for baking.
Note:
*    Modelling of simplified human figures, birds, animals and plants in relief and round.
Geometrical  shapes  like cube,  cone,  cylinder,  etc., and  their composition  in relief  as an exercise in design study of textures. Use of plaster of Paris.                                       10 Marks
1.   The candidate should be given one hour break after first three hours.
2.   The time table to be so framed as to allow the students to work continuously for minimum of two periods at a stretch.
GUIDELINES FOR EVALUATION OF PRACTICAL
1.  Marking Scheme:
Part I:  Modelling in Relief
(i) Composition including emphasis on the subject (ii)  Handling of media
(iii) Creative approach and overall impression
10
05    20 Marks
05
Part II: Modelling in Round
(i) Composition including emphasis on the subject (ii)  Handling of media
(iii) Creative approach and overall impression
10
05    20 Marks
05
Part Ill: Portfolio Assessment
(a)  Record of the enitre year’s performance from sketch to finished product.  10
(b)  Four works of sculpture consisting of:
(i) One sculpture in relief (High Relief)
(ii) One sculpture in relief (Low Relief)
(c) Two Sculpture in round
2.5
2.5
05
20 Marks
2.   Format of the questions:
Part I: Modelling in Relief:
Make a sculpture in Relief (low/high) on any one of the following five subjects. The size should be within 25 to 30 cm. (horizontally or vertically) and about 4 cm. in thickness from the board.
(Note: Any five suitable subjects for “Modelling in Relief ‘ are to be decided by the external and internal examiners jointly in accordance with the instructions and are to be mentioned here).
Part II: Modellingin Round:
Prepare a sculpture in round, in clay medium, on any one of the following five subjects. The height should be within 25 to 30 cm, horizontally or vertically.
Note: Any five suitable subjects for “Modelling in Round” are to be decided in accordance with the instructions and are to be mentioned here strictly just before the start of the examination for Part II.
3.  Instructions to decide the subjects for Modelling in Reil ef and Round:
(1) The examiners (Internal and External) are to select/ decide five subjects suitable for modelling in relief and five subjects for modelling in round. The subjects for “Modelling in Round” are to be conveyed to the candidates strictly just before the start of the examination for Part 11.
(2) Each subject should be so designed that the candidate may get a clear-cut idea of the subject, however, a candidate can perceive a subject in his/her own way. Distortion of human/animal forms may be allowed.
(3)  Choice of high or low rel ef should remain open to the candidates.
(4) The examiners (Internal and External) are free to decide the subjects but they should be according to the standard of class XII and environment of the school/candidates. Some identified areas of the subjects for Modellingin Relief are given below in which some more areas may also beincluded:
(i)      Nature Study;
(ii)   Design, natural, decorative, stylized and geometrical: (iii)   Family, friends and daily life;
(iv)     Birds and animals;
(v)     Games and sports activities;
(vi)    Religious, social and personal activities; (vii)    Cultural activities;
(viii)   Ideas – Personal,social,local, provincial, national and international.
4. General instructions to the examiners:
1.  Candidates should be given one hour break after first three hours.
2.   Work of the candidates of Parts I, II and Ill, is to be evaluated on the spot by the external and internal examiners jointly.
3.  Each work of Parts I, II and 111, after assessment, is to be marked as examined and duly signed by the external and internal examiners.
Some Reference books for teachers:
1.  “Indian Sculpture”, by Chintaman Kar.
2.   “Exploring Sculpture”, by Jan Arndell Mills &. Boon, London.
3.  “The Technique of Sculpture”, John W. Mills, P.T. Patsford Ltd., London.
4.    “A History Sculpture of the world”, Shelden Cneey, Thame and Hudson, London.
5.   “Form and Space”, Edward Their,Thomes and Hudson; London.
6.    “Sculpture and Ideas”, Michael F. Andrews.
7.    “Modern Sculpture”, Jean Selz, Heinemann, London.
8.  “Creative Carving”, (Material techniques appreciation), Dons Z. Meilach, Pritam Publishing.
(D) APPLIED ART (COMMERCIAL ART)
(Code No. 52)
Introduction
The course in Applied Art (Commercial Art) at Senior Secondary stage as an elective subject is aimed to develop aesthetic sense of the students through the understanding to various important, wellknown aspects and modes of visual art expression in India’s rich cultural heritage from the period of Indus Valley to the present time. It encompasses also a wide range of practical exercises in commercial art for developing their
mental faculties of observation, imagination, creation and physical and technical skills.
Objectives
A)  THEORY (History of Indian Art)
Notes: As the syllabus of Applied Art-Commercial Art (Theory) is the same as that of Painting (Theory), its objectives are same.
B)  PRACTICAL: The purpose of introducing practical exercises in Applied Art (Commercial Art) is to help
and enable the students to develop professional competence in making Model Drawing Lettering,layout preparation and poster so that they can link their lives with productivity.
One Theory Paper
Unitwise Weightage
CLASS-XI (THEORY)
40 Marks
Time:2 Hours
UnitsPeriodsMarks
History of Indian Art
1Pre-Historic Rock-Paintings and Art of Indus Valley1210
2Buddhist, Jain and Hindu Art2415
3Temple  Sculpture   Bronze  and  Artistic   aspects ArchitectureofInda-Islamic3615
7240
Note: The Syllabus of Applied Art-Commercial Art  (Theory) for  Class XI is the same as that of  Painting
(Theory) for Class XI given earlier.
One Practical Paper
Unitwise Weightage
CLASS-XI  (PRACTICALS)
60 Marks
Time: 6 Hours (3+3)
UnitsPeriodsMarks
1Drawing5020
2Lettering and layout5020
3Portfolio Assessment4820
14860
Unit 1: Drawing
Drawing from Still-Life and Nature, medium-pencil monochrome/colour.
50 Pds.
Unit 2: (a) Lettering
(i)  Study of lettering of Roman and Devnagri Scripts (ii) Identification of some type-faces and their sizes
(b) Layout
Making a simple layout with lettering as the main component.
50 Pds.
Unit 3:  Portfolio Assessment                                                                                                                  48 Pds.
(a)  Record of entire year’s performance from sketch to finished product.                                        (10)
(b) Five selected drawings in any media done during the year including minimum three lives.     (05)
(c) Two selected works in chosen subject done during the year.                                                (05)
Note:
1.  The candidate should be given one hour break after first three hours.
2.  The time table to be so framed as to allow the students to work continuously for minimum of two periods at a stretch.
CLASS-XII  (THEORY)
One Theory Paper
Unitwise Weightage
40 Marks
Time: 2 Hour
UnitsPeriodsMarks
History of Indian Art
1The Rajasthani and Pahari Schools of Miniature Painting1810
2The Mughal and Deccan Schools of Miniature Painting1810
3The Indian National Flag and the Bengal School of Painting1810
4The Modern Trends in Indian Art1810
7240
Note: The Syllabus of Applied Art-Commercial Art  (Theory)  for  ClassXll is the same as that of  Painting
(Theory) for Class X II given earlier.
CLASS-XII  (PRACTICAL)
One Practical Paper
Unitwise Weightage
60 Marks
Time: 6 Hours (3+3)
UnitsPeriodsMarks
1Illustration5020
2Poster5020
3    I Portfolio Assessment4820
14860
Unit 1: Illustration50 Periods
Study  of  techniques of illustration on  given subjects  and simple situations supported  by drawing
from life and outdoor sketching in different media suitable for printing.
Unit 2:  Poster                                                                                                                                50 Periods
Making a poster with specified data and slogan on a given subject in two or three colours.
Unit 3:  Portfolio Assessment                                                                                                         48 Periods
(a)  Record of the entire years performance from sketch to finished product.                                  (10)
(b) Five selected drawings in any media done during the year including minimum of two illustrations
(05)
(c) Two selected posters in chosen subject .                                                                    (05)
Note: The time table to  be so framed as to allow the students to work  continuously for  minimum of two
periods at a stretch.
1.  Marking Scheme:
Guidelines for Evaluation of Practical
Part I: Illustrations
(i)  Composition including quality of drawing
(ii) Emphasis on the subject with a specific situation (iii) Reproducing quality and overall impression
05     20 Marks 05
Part II: Poster
(i)  Layout and Lettering
(ii) Emphasis on the subject
(iii) Proper colour scheme, overall impression and reproducing quality
10}
05     20 Marks
05
Part Ill: Portfolio Assessment
(a)  Record of the entire year’s performance from sketch to finished product.
(b) Five selected drawings in any media including minimum of two illustrations.
(c)  Two selected posters in chosen subjects.
10}
05     20 Marks
05
2.   Format of the questions:
Part I: Illustration
Make an illustration in black and white in any colour media on any one of the following five subjects with a specific situation.
Size of the illustration: 30 cm x 22 cm.
Note:    Any five suitable subjects or illustration, decided by the external and internal examiners jointly in accordance with the instructions are to be mentioned here.
Part II: Poster
Prepare a poster-design with specified data and slogan in English/Hindi/Regional language, in three flat colours, on any one of the following five subjects. The designing of the poster should have balanced use of typography and illustration.
Size of the Poster-design: 1/2 imp size.
Note: Any five suitable subjects for poster design decided by the external and internal examiners jointly in accordance with the instructions and are mentioned here, strictly just before the start of the examination for Part II.
3.  A)    Instructions to decide the subjects for illustration:
1.  The examiners (Internal and External) are to select/decide five suitable subjects.
2.   Each  subject  should  be  given  a  specific  situation,  which  is  a  main  characteristic  of  an illustration.
3.   Each subject should be so designed that the candidate may get a clear-cut idea of the subject and they can illustrate a specific situation based on given subject areas.
4.    The examiners (Internal and External) are free to decide the subjects but these should be according to the standard of the class XII and environment of the school/ candidates.
Some identified areas of the subjects for illustration are given below, in which some more areas may be added if needed.
Subject with a specific situation:
(i)  Family and friends in daily life.
(ii)  Professionals/ professions. (iii) Games and sports.
(iv) Nature.
(v)  National events and celebrations.
(vi) Religious events and festivals. (vii)Culture- Dance, Drama, Music and Art.
B)   Instructions to decide the subjects for Poster-design:
1.  The examiners (Internal and External) are to select/decide five subjects suitable for poster-design.
2.   Each subject should be given a specified data and slogan.
3.   The data and slogan should be so framed/designed that the candidates may get a clear-cut idea of the subject.
4.   The examiners (Internal and External) must give the subjects data and slogan according to the standard of Class XII and environment of the school/ candidates.
Some identified areas for poster-design are given below, in which some more areas/subject s may be added.
1.  For Advertisement on:
(i) Excursion/Tourism (ii)  Cultural activities
(iii) Community and nature development
(iv) Ideas-Social, national and international
(v)  Commercial products
2. Instructions to the examiners:
1.  Candidates should be given one hour break after first three hours.
2.  Work of the candidates for Parts I, II and Ill is to be evaluated on the spot by the external and internal examiners jointly.
3.  Each work of parts I, II and 111 , after assessment,is to be marked as examined and signed by the external and internal examiners.
Some Reference Books for teachers
1.  Typolog – G.M. Rege, Bombay.
2.   Kalatmak Likhai, Published by D.A. V. P.
3.  Figure Painting in Water Colour, Charles Reid Watson,Guptill Publication. 4.  Walter T. Foster – Objective Drawing.
5.  Walter T. Foster – Human Figure. 6.   Walter T. Foster- Head Study.
7.  Walter T. Foster – Animal Study. 8.  Walter T. Foster – Landscape.
9.   Applied Art Handbook – G.M. Rege, Bombay.
Some Reference Books for Theory portion of Painting, Graphics, Sculpture and Applied Art :
1.  ‘llrnf cit f-q?ICf1(11
2.                      fil?ICf1(11 fueJUT
3.                fil?1ict11
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21.  Hindustan Masavri
22. The Heritage of Indian Art
23. Studies in Indian Art
24. Indian Painting
25.  History of Indian and Indonesian Art
26.  South Indian Bronzes
27. Discovering  Indian  Sculpture,  A   Brief History
28. Story of Indian Art
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By Dr. Anis Farooqi
Dr. Vasudev Sharan Agrawal
Dr. Vasudev Sharan Agrawal, Banaras Hindu University Publ cation,Varanasi  (U.P.)
Percy Brown, YMCA Publ shing House, Massey Hall, Jai Singh Road (Near Parl ament Street) New Delhi-110001
A. K. Coomaraswamy, Dover Publication, Inc., New York.
C. Civaramamurti , Lal t Kala Academi, New Delhi-I 10001.
Dr. Charles L. Fabri, Affiliated East-West Press Pvt. Ltd., C-57, Defense Colony, New Delhi-110024.
S.K. Bhattacharya, Atma Ram & Sons, Kashmiri Gate, Delhi-I 10006.
30. Glory of Indian Miniature
31 . Indian Painting
32. Indian Artists through the ages 33 . Contemporary Indian Artists
34. Monographs on Amar Nath Sehgal. Amrita Shergil, Abanindra Nath Tagore,
D.P. Roy Chowdhury, Dhanaj Bhagat, Gaganendra Nath Tagore, K.K. Hebbar, Krishna Reddy, M.F. Husain, Rabindra Nath Tagore, Jamini Roy, P.V. Janakiram, Lalit Kala Contemporary
35. Monographs, Portfolios and prints of contemporary IModern paintings and sculptures which are included in the course of study.
36 . Portfolios, books and prints of Paintings and sculptures which are included in the course of study Govt. of India), Janpath,
37 . Contemporary Art in India-A Perspective
38.  History  of  Indian  Painting (Volume-I to
V)
Dr.  Daljeet,  Mahindra  Publications,  R-5/ 11,  New  Raj
Nagar, Ghaziabad, Utttar Pradesh -201002.
C.Sivaramamurti , National Book Trust, India A-5, Green Park, New Delhi-110016
R.K. Chopra, R.K.C. Publications H-49, Raghu Nagar, Pankha Road, New Delhi-110045.
Geeta Kapoor, Vikas Publishing House, Darya Ganj, Delhi – 110002
Lal t Kala Akademi , Rabindra Bhawan, Copernicus Marg, (New Mandi House), New Delhi-110001 .
National Gallery of Modern Art (Deptt. of Culture, Ministry of H.R.D. Govt. of India) : Jaipur House, Near India Gate, New Delhi-110003 .
National Museum (Deptt. of Culture, Ministry of H.R.D.) New Delhi-110011
Prof. P.N. Mago National Book Trust of India, New Delhi-110016
Krishna Chaitanya, Abhinav Publications,  Hauzkhas, New Delhi

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