Kapurthala District of Punjab at a Glance

About Kapurthala District :

Kapurthala district (Punjabi: ਕਪੂਰਥਲਾ ਜ਼ਿਲ੍ਹਾ) is a district of Punjab state in northern Republic of India. The city of Kapurthala is the district headquarters.

Kapurthala District is one of the smallest districts of Punjab in terms of both area and population, with 754,521 people by the 2001 census. The district is divided into two noncontiguous parts, the main Kapurthala-Sultanpur Lodhi portion and the Phagwara tehsil or block.

The Kapurthala-Sultanpur Lodhi part lies between north latitude 31° 07′ and 31° 22′ and east longitude 75° 36′. In the north it is bound by Hoshiarpur, Gurdaspur, and Amritsar districts, in the west by the Beas River and Amritsar district, and in south by the Sutlej River, Jalandhar district, and Hoshiarpur district.

Phagwara tehsil lies between north latitude 31° 22′ and east longitude 75° 40′ and 75° 55′. Phagwara lies on the National Highway No 1, and the tehsil is much more industrially developed than the remainder of Kapurthala District. Phagwara is situated at a distance of 19 kilometers (12 mi) southwest of Jalandhar, and the tehsil is bounded on all sides by Jalandhar District except in the northeast, where it is bounded by Hoshiarpur district.

The district has three subdivisions/tehsils: Kapurthala, Phagwara, and Sultanpur Lodhi. The total area of the district is 1633 km² (630 mi²) of which 909.09 km² (350.91 mi²) is in Kapurthala tehsil, 304.05 km² (117.36 mi²) in Phagwara tehsil and 451.0 km² (174.1 mi²) in Sultanpur Lodhi tehsil. The economy of the district is still predominantly agricultural. The major crops are wheat, rice, sugarcane, potato and maize. The major portion of Kapurthala district lies between the Beas River and the Kali-Bein River and is called the ‘BET’ area. This area is prone to floods. Water logging and alkalinity in the soil is the major problem of the area. A flood protection bundh called ‘Dhussi Bundh’ has been constructed along the left bank of the Beas River, and it has saved the area from the ravages of flood. The entire district is an alluvial plain. To the south of the river Kali-Bein lies the tract known as ‘Dona’ meaning the soil formed of two constituents i.e. the sand and clay.

The climate is typical of the Punjab plains i.e. hot in summers and cold in winters. It has sub-tropical continental monsoon type climate. Intensive cultivation in the district leaves no scope for forest cover and the wild life is practically nonexistent.

District at a Glance :

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Tourist Places :

Jagatjit Palace on a beautiful night
The Jagatjit Palace
Jagatjit Palace is, most indisputably, Kapurthala’s most famous building. It was, once upon a time, the home of Maharaja Jagatjit Singh, the main architect of modern day Kapurthala.
It was constructed in 1906 by M. Marcel under the Maharaja’s guidance. It’s architecture was inspired by the Palaces of Versallies and Fontainbleau.
Mazar of Mir Nasir Ahmed
Mazar of Mir Nasir Ahmed
The Mazar of Mir Nasir Ahmed, stands amidst dense foliage . Mir Nasir Ahmed, a descendant of the legendary Tansen, founded the Kapurthala Gharana, or the school of music. He was brought to Kapurthala by Kanwar Bikrama Singh in 1858. Today, this monument is a pilgrimage site for classical musicians; while the land is used as a graveyard.
The Shahi Samadhis
The Shahi Samadhs
The Shahi Samadhs (The Royal Cenotaphs) in the Shalimar Gardens, emphasise the traditions of its ruling Dynasty. Marble obelisks inside the red sandstone Chambers, are Memorials to the former Rulers and their families. Nearby, a grand structure built in 1880 and built on a marble plinth, houses the Samadhs of Maharajas Kharak Singh, Jagatjit Singh and Paramjit Singh.
Moorish Mosque
Moorish Mosque
Conceived by M. Manteaux, the mosque was built in 1930. Its construction was started in 1927. Three years and some six lakhs of rupees later, the Mosque was completed. It was inspired by the Qutbia Mosque in Marakesh, and consecrated in the presence of Nawab Sadiq Mohd. Khan Bhadur, the Nawab of Bhawalpur.
Panch Mandir
Panch Mandir
Panch Mandir of Kapurthala is a place of reverence for all faiths. This temple is home to five small temples. Built during the reign of Sardar Fateh Singh, an extraordinary feature of this temple is that from the entry door, one can view all the five idols and pay obeisance to all.
The State Gurudwara
The State Gurudwara
The striking red sandstone building(now painted white) of the state Gurudwara was consecrated in 1915. Built in the Indo- Saracenic style, it has vast expanses of marble haloed by the feet of the hundreds of devotees.
The Jubilee Hall
The Jubilee Hall
The imposing Jubilee Hall was built to celebrate the Silver Jubilee of Maharaja Jagatjit Singh’s rule in 1916. The State Assembly used to meet here. It presently houses a College which was established by Raja Randhir Singh in 1856.
The Villa Buona Vista
The Villa Buona Vista
The Villa Buona Vista was built in 1899, the Villa Buona Vista is a delightful building which was once the hunting-lodge of the Maharaja, on the banks of the river Bein, designed by J.O.S. Elmore.
Kanjli Wetland
Kanjli Wetland
Kanjli Wetland, on the western Bein rivulet at the outskirts of the city, has been included in under the Ramsar Convention. It is a a very popular site for bird watching and boating. An enormous project is currently being undertaken here to develop it into a destination for bird watching replete with modern day facilities.
State Guest House
State Guest House
Standing near the Jagatjit Palace and the Jagatjit Club, this palatial building was built in 1863 by Raja Randhir Singh. This mansion is now being used as the State Circuit House.
State Guest House
Durbar Hall
The stately Durbar Hall stands proudly at the very centre of the city. It was, at one time the Court of Maharaja Jagatjit Singh, its creator. It was in this majestic building that he used to receive the people of his kingdom, listen to their woes and render justice. The Maharaja’s annual birthday celebrations and other State rituals and ceremonies were also held here.
State Guest House
Ghanta Ghar
Ghanta Ghar or he Clock Tower still stands majestically as a constant reminder of the city’s Royal past. It was build in 1901. Ironically enough, the clock stopped chiming in 1949 when Maharaja Jagatjit Singh breathed his last.
State Guest House
Gurudwara Ber Sahib
The Gurudwara Ber Sahib is situated on the banks of the holy Bein. This is where Guru Nanak Sahib entered the Bein rivulet, also known as the Babe di Nadi.and remained in its waters for three days.
State Guest House
Jagatjit Club
On the Kapurthala’s Mall Road is the Jagatjit Club, which has, over the years, housed a church, a Cinema Hall and now the local club. Its Grecian columns and bell tower make it an interesting visit.

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